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Backing Up
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If Your Car Stocked
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Long Trips
Night Driving
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Preventing Skids
Road Sharing
Road Site Assistance
Setting Out
Survival Kit

Preparing for a long trip

 
Before you leave for a long trip, inspect your vehicle and have it checked by a professional mechanic and there are some checks you can do yourself or have it done by a service station attendant.
Check:
  • All the lights.
  • The oil level.
  • The drive belts. Tighten if necessary.
  • Make sure there is enough coolant in the radiator coolant tank.
  • Fill up your windshield washer tank and check the conditions of the wiper blades.
  • Clean the car windows inside and out.
  • If you're pulling a trailer, make sure the trailer lights are working.
Planing your Route
Plan your route and overnight stops well in advance. Leave details of your route or destination with a relative or friend.
Ask for Directions
If you need directions, stop at a truck stop. You are sure to find a truck driver who knows the area in which you are interested. He or she will be glad to advise you.
Fatigue
Don't drive when you're tired. You won't arrive any earlier. You may not arrive at all. Fatigue can creep up on you. There's no warning. A nod of the head and anything can happen. You risk your life and the lives of others on the road.
Some warning signs are:
  • Blurred or double vision,
  • Itchy or burning eyes,
  • Inability to attend to the task of driving,
  • Correcting lane position more frequently than usual,
  • Sudden small sensations of fear or of falling asleep.
Stop Frequently
  • Stop regularly for refreshments and exercise.
  • Use your gas stop to take a break, and stretch your legs.
  • Take a nap.
  • Don't drive during your normal sleeping hours.
  • If you start to feel sleepy: open a window, talk to passengers or sing.
  • Move your body.
  • Stop frequently in a rest area or at a service centre.
  • Talk a short walk, or have a beverage and a light snack.
 
The Driver Permit Strudy Guide
The Driver's Permit Study Guide
The Computerized Licensing Test Study Guide
The Computerized
Study Guide
The Motorcycle's Permit Study Guide
The Motorcycle's Permit Study Guide
The Truck's Permit Study Guide
The Truck's Permit
Study Guide
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CAA Driver Training Where Driving is for life
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